Injection Moulding

As the name suggests, Injection Moulding is a manufacturing process for producing parts by injecting molten material into a mould made of metal, usually an alloy of steel or aluminium. In relation to 3D printing, latest advances have made it possible to produce these moulds from certain photopolymers which do not melt when injected with some lower temperature thermoplastics. Metallic moulds require heavy investment and long lead times, since the precision tooling of metals to accurately match the product requirements needs intensive work. On the other hand, photopolymer moulds are easier and quicker to produce but have limited complexity and range of materials.

This process is best suited for production of parts of any size with uniform quality on a large scale. However it is important to get the design right before tooling, since any changes to a finished mould can be costly and time consuming. Additionally, to keep the build cost per unit low, it is necessary that a large number of parts (100s or 1000s) are cast on each occasion.

Injection Moulding

As the name suggests, Injection Moulding is a manufacturing process for producing parts by injecting molten material into a mould made of metal, usually an alloy of steel or aluminium. In relation to 3D printing, latest advances have made it possible to produce these moulds from certain photopolymers which do not melt when injected with some lower temperature thermoplastics. Metallic moulds require heavy investment and long lead times, since the precision tooling of metals to accurately match the product requirements needs intensive work. On the other hand, photopolymer moulds are easier and quicker to produce but have limited complexity and range of materials.

This process is best suited for production of parts of any size with uniform quality on a large scale. However it is important to get the design right before tooling, since any changes to a finished mould can be costly and time consuming. Additionally, to keep the build cost per unit low, it is necessary that a large number of parts (100s or 1000s) are cast on each occasion.

Injection Moulding

As the name suggests, Injection Moulding is a manufacturing process for producing parts by injecting molten material into a mould made of metal, usually an alloy of steel or aluminium. In relation to 3D printing, latest advances have made it possible to produce these moulds from certain photopolymers which do not melt when injected with some lower temperature thermoplastics. Metallic moulds require heavy investment and long lead times, since the precision tooling of metals to accurately match the product requirements needs intensive work. On the other hand, photopolymer moulds are easier and quicker to produce but have limited complexity and range of materials.

This process is best suited for production of parts of any size with uniform quality on a large scale. However it is important to get the design right before tooling, since any changes to a finished mould can be costly and time consuming. Additionally, to keep the build cost per unit low, it is necessary that a large number of parts (100s or 1000s) are cast on each occasion.

As the name suggests, Injection Moulding is a manufacturing process for producing parts by injecting molten material into a mould made of metal, usually an alloy of steel or aluminium. In relation to 3D printing, latest advances have made it possible to produce these moulds from certain photopolymers which do not melt when injected with some lower temperature thermoplastics. Metallic moulds require heavy investment and long lead times, since the precision tooling of metals to accurately match the product requirements needs intensive work. On the other hand, photopolymer moulds are easier and quicker to produce but have limited complexity and range of materials.This process is best suited for production of parts of any size with uniform quality on a large scale. However it is important to get the design right before tooling, since any changes to a finished mould can be costly and time consuming. Additionally, to keep the build cost per unit low, it is necessary that a large number of parts (100s or 1000s) are cast on each occasion.